(Solution) 103 --- CASE Fred Bailey: An Innocent Abroad Fred Gazed Out The Window Of His 24th Floor Office At The Tranquil Beauty Of The Imperial Palace Amidst... | Snapessays.com


(Solution) 103 --- CASE Fred Bailey: An Innocent Abroad Fred gazed out the window of his 24th floor office at the tranquil beauty of the Imperial Palace amidst...


2) Synopsis of Case Study:

 

 

? The synopsis should be a brief summary of the case study. You are assuming that I, the reader, am unaware of the case’s contents. Include, however, only the important, key points.

 

1 page please103 CASE

 

---

 

Fred Bailey: An Innocent

 

Abroad

 

Fred gazed out the window of his 24th floor office at the tranquil beauty of the Imperial Palace

 

amidst the hustle and bustle of downtown Tokyo. Only six months ago, Fred had arrived with

 

his wife and two children for this three-year assignment as the director of Kline

 

& Associates' Tokyo office. Kline & Associates is a large, multinational consulting firm with offices in 19 countries worldwide. Fred was now trying to decide if he should simply pack up and tell the home office that he was coming home, or whether he should somehow try to convince his wife and himself that they should stay and finish the assignment. Given how excited Fred thought they all were about the assignment to begin with, it was a mystery to Fred as to how things had gotten to this point. As he watched the swans glide across the water in the moat that surrounds the Imperial Palace, Fred reflected on the past seven months. Seven months ago, the managing partner of the main office in Boston, Dave Steiner, asked Fred to lunch to discuss business. To Fred's surprise, the business was not the major project that he and his team had just finished but was instead a very big promotion and career move. Fred was offered the position of managing director of the firm's relatively new Tokyo office which had a staff of 40, including seven Americans. Most of the Americans in the Tokyo office were either associate consultants or research analysts. Fred would be in charge of the whole office and would report to a senior partner who was in charge of the Asian region. It was implied to Fred that if this assignment went as well as his past ones, it would be the last step before becoming a partner in the firm. When Fred told Jenny, his wife, about the unbelievable opportunity, he was shocked at her less-than-enthusiastic response. She thought that it would be difficult for the children live and go to school in a foreign country for three years, especially when Christine, the oldest, would be starting middle school next year. Besides, now that the kids were in school, Jenny was thinking about going back to work-at least part time. Jenny had a degree in fashion merchandising from a well-known private university and had worked as an assistant buyer for a large women's clothing store before having the two girls. Fred explained that the career opportunity was just too good to pass up and that the company's overseas package would make living overseas terrific. The company would pay all the expenses to move whatever the Baileys wanted to take with them. The company had a very nice house in an expensive district of Tokyo that would be provided to them rent-free. Additionally, the company would rent their house in Boston during their absence. Also, the firm would provide a car and driver, education expenses for the children to attend private schools, and a cost-of-living adjustment and overseas compensation that would nearly triple Fred's gross annual salary. After two days of consideration and discussion, Fred told Dave Steiner he would accept the assignment. The previous Tokyo officemanaging director was a partner in the firm but had only been in the new Tokyo officefor less than a year when he was transferred to head up a long-established officein England. Becausethe transfer to England was taking place right away,Fred and his family had about three weeks to prepare fbr the move. Betweengetting things at the officetransferred to Bob Newcome, who was being promoted to Fred's position, and the logistical hassles of getting furniture and the like ready to be moved, neither Fred nor his familyhad much time to really find out much about Japan, other than what was in the encyclopedia. Case 103 • Fred Bailey: An Innocent Abroad 297 https://www.coursehero.com/tutors-problems/Business/8295974 8295974 Briefly describe the primary milestones (physical, cognitive and social) that are associated with adolescent development. How have adolescents Briefly describe the primary milestones (physical, cognitive and social) that are associated with adolescent development. How have adolescents changed over the last 30 years? How have they remained the same? write 250-300 words supply references apa format https://www.coursehero.com/tutors-problems/Business/8295976 8295976 103 --- CASE Fred Bailey: An Innocent Abroad Fred gazed out the window of his 24th floor office at the tranquil beauty of the Imperial Palace amidst... Describe the organizational problems. Include any theoretical support. For example: An organization has some problems with productivity. Apparently the company is using goal setting inaccurately. Now describe goal setting and how it is an integral part of this organization’s productivity problems. Utilize textbook and other references (if necessary) for theoretical support and application. please 1 page103 CASE --- Fred Bailey: An Innocent Abroad Fred gazed out the window of his 24th floor office at the tranquil beauty of the Imperial Palace amidst the hustle and bustle of downtown Tokyo. Only six months ago, Fred had arrived with his wife and two children for this three-year assignment as the director of Kline & Associates' Tokyo office. Kline & Associates is a large, multinational consulting firm with offices in 19 countries worldwide. Fred was now trying to decide if he should simply pack up and tell the home office that he was coming home, or whether he should somehow try to convince his wife and himself that they should stay and finish the assignment. Given how excited Fred thought they all were about the assignment to begin with, it was a mystery to Fred as to how things had gotten to this point. As he watched the swans glide across the water in the moat that surrounds the Imperial Palace, Fred reflected on the past seven months. Seven months ago, the managing partner of the main office in Boston, Dave Steiner, asked Fred to lunch to discuss business. To Fred's surprise, the business was not the major project that he and his team had just finished but was instead a very big promotion and career move. Fred was offered the position of managing director of the firm's relatively new Tokyo office which had a staff of 40, including seven Americans. Most of the Americans in the Tokyo office were either associate consultants or research analysts. Fred would be in charge of the whole office and would report to a senior partner who was in charge of the Asian region. It was implied to Fred that if this assignment went as well as his past ones, it would be the last step before becoming a partner in the firm. When Fred told Jenny, his wife, about the unbelievable opportunity, he was shocked at her less-than-enthusiastic response. She thought that it would be difficult for the children live and go to school in a foreign country for three years, especially when Christine, the oldest, would be starting middle school next year. Besides, now that the kids were in school, Jenny was thinking about going back to work-at least part time. Jenny had a degree in fashion merchandising from a well-known private university and had worked as an assistant buyer for a large women's clothing store before having the two girls. Fred explained that the career opportunity was just too good to pass up and that the company's overseas package would make living overseas terrific. The company would pay all the expenses to move whatever the Baileys wanted to take with them. The company had a very nice house in an expensive district of Tokyo that would be provided to them rent-free. Additionally, the company would rent their house in Boston during their absence. Also, the firm would provide a car and driver, education expenses for the children to attend private schools, and a cost-of-living adjustment and overseas compensation that would nearly triple Fred's gross annual salary. After two days of consideration and discussion, Fred told Dave Steiner he would accept the assignment. The previous Tokyo officemanaging director was a partner in the firm but had only been in the new Tokyo officefor less than a year when he was transferred to head up a long-established officein England. Becausethe transfer to England was taking place right away,Fred and his family had about three weeks to prepare fbr the move. Betweengetting things at the officetransferred to Bob Newcome, who was being promoted to Fred's position, and the logistical hassles of getting furniture and the like ready to be moved, neither Fred nor his familyhad much time to really find out much about Japan, other than what was in the encyclopedia. Case 103 • Fred Bailey: An Innocent Abroad 297 https://www.coursehero.com/tutors-problems/Business/8295980 8295980 103 --- CASE Fred Bailey: An Innocent Abroad Fred gazed out the window of his 24th floor office at the tranquil beauty of the Imperial Palace amidst... "Describe the organizational problems. Include any theoretical support. For example: An organization has some problems with productivity. Apparently the company is using goal setting inaccurately. Now describe goal setting and how it is an integral part of this organization’s productivity problems. Utilize textbook and other references (if necessary) for theoretical support and application and any proposed solutions should have theoretical support (see #3 above). Also discuss Pros and Cons of each solution. please 1 and a half page thanks103 CASE --- Fred Bailey: An Innocent Abroad Fred gazed out the window of his 24th floor office at the tranquil beauty of the Imperial Palace amidst the hustle and bustle of downtown Tokyo. Only six months ago, Fred had arrived with his wife and two children for this three-year assignment as the director of Kline & Associates' Tokyo office. Kline & Associates is a large, multinational consulting firm with offices in 19 countries worldwide. Fred was now trying to decide if he should simply pack up and tell the home office that he was coming home, or whether he should somehow try to convince his wife and himself that they should stay and finish the assignment. Given how excited Fred thought they all were about the assignment to begin with, it was a mystery to Fred as to how things had gotten to this point. As he watched the swans glide across the water in the moat that surrounds the Imperial Palace, Fred reflected on the past seven months. Seven months ago, the managing partner of the main office in Boston, Dave Steiner, asked Fred to lunch to discuss business. To Fred's surprise, the business was not the major project that he and his team had just finished but was instead a very big promotion and career move. Fred was offered the position of managing director of the firm's relatively new Tokyo office which had a staff of 40, including seven Americans. Most of the Americans in the Tokyo office were either associate consultants or research analysts. Fred would be in charge of the whole office and would report to a senior partner who was in charge of the Asian region. It was implied to Fred that if this assignment went as well as his past ones, it would be the last step before becoming a partner in the firm. When Fred told Jenny, his wife, about the unbelievable opportunity, he was shocked at her less-than-enthusiastic response. She thought that it would be difficult for the children live and go to school in a foreign country for three years, especially when Christine, the oldest, would be starting middle school next year. Besides, now that the kids were in school, Jenny was thinking about going back to work-at least part time. Jenny had a degree in fashion merchandising from a well-known private university and had worked as an assistant buyer for a large women's clothing store before having the two girls. Fred explained that the career opportunity was just too good to pass up and that the company's overseas package would make living overseas terrific. The company would pay all the expenses to move whatever the Baileys wanted to take with them. The company had a very nice house in an expensive district of Tokyo that would be provided to them rent-free. Additionally, the company would rent their house in Boston during their absence. Also, the firm would provide a car and driver, education expenses for the children to attend private schools, and a cost-of-living adjustment and overseas compensation that would nearly triple Fred's gross annual salary. After two days of consideration and discussion, Fred told Dave Steiner he would accept the assignment. The previous Tokyo officemanaging director was a partner in the firm but had only been in the new Tokyo officefor less than a year when he was transferred to head up a long-established officein England. Becausethe transfer to England was taking place right away,Fred and his family had about three weeks to prepare fbr the move. Betweengetting things at the officetransferred to Bob Newcome, who was being promoted to Fred's position, and the logistical hassles of getting furniture and the like ready to be moved, neither Fred nor his familyhad much time to really find out much about Japan, other than what was in the encyclopedia. Case 103 • Fred Bailey: An Innocent Abroad 297 https://www.coursehero.com/tutors-problems/Business/8295988 8295988 compute the following .r = correlation between x and y = - 0.7 = mean of the values of x = 50.25 = mean of the values of y = 31.77 = standard... 1.compute the following .r = correlation between x and y = – 0.7 = mean of the values of x = 50.25 = mean of the values of y = 31.77 = standard deviation of the values of x = 15.85 = standard deviation of the values of y = 1.76The slope of the least-squares line is???? https://www.coursehero.com/tutors-problems/Business/8295990 8295990 CASE ASSIGNMENT: Best Buy Thousands of Possibilities. Get Yours. The promise of the long-awaited digital revolution has finally been fulfilled.... Please find the attached marketing case study assignment.CASE ASSIGNMENT: Best Buy Thousands of Possibilities. Get Yours. The promise of the long-awaited digital revolution has finally been fulfilled. Flat-panel televisions, MP3 players, wireless laptops, cell phones with Internet browsing capability, wirelessly networked computing devices for the home, digitally controlled home appliances, and more are no longer the toys of a future generation. They are here today, and Best Buy wants to sell them—all of them—to anyone with the money to burn on such luxury items. In addition to all the gee-whiz electronic merchandise, the company still sells coffee makers, vacuum cleaners, and washing machines, albeit slightly more expensive ones than before. The new digital gadgets, however, are fast crossing the threshold from expensive luxury items to affordable common electronics. The upside is that more customers are able to buy such products; the downside is the negative

 

pressure put on prices and revenues. If any retailer can find a way to survive and turn a profit in the fiercely

 

competitive electronics and home appliance industry, it’s Best Buy. Twenty years ago, when it operated under the

 

name Sound of Music, a tornado ripped through its flagship store, and the company held a

 

“best buy” sale to liquidate its merchandise and cover the costs of repairs. The success of the sale was the impetus

 

for the name change to Best Buy, and the opening of its first superstore in 1984 marked the beginning of “big box”

 

retailing as it is known today. Nine years later, the new look national chain surpassed Circuit City as the number one

 

retailer in the segment. Best Buy’s stores offer a dizzying array of products (its stores have nearly 25,000 separate

 

items) at affordable prices.

 

Usually located in a small- or medium-sized outdoor shopping centers with other “big box” retailers, an

 

average 40,000-square-foot Best Buy store is large enough to hold ample stock of all available items while still

 

comfortably accommodating customers. Bright lights, concrete floors, wide and easily navigated aisles, oversize

 

shopping carts, and a helpful but unobtrusive staff dressed in blue shirts and khaki pants have put Best Buy at the

 

head of the retail class when it comes to customer satisfaction surveys. Best Buy’s television commercials, which

 

feature the tag line, “Thousands of Possibilities. Get Yours,” communicate an accurate picture of the customer

 

experience. Inside every Best Buy store, a canned deejay plays the latest popular music over the public address

 

system; recently released DVDs play on big-screen TVs; and personal computers, video game modules, home stereo

 

systems, and more are turned on and available for customers to tinker with.

 

The ability to connect with its customers has brought Best Buy a 16 percent share of the $130 billion North

 

American market for electronics and related devices. It now operates 600 stores in the United States and plans to

 

open 60 or so new stores each year for the near future. Competition, however, is stiffening. Best Buy’s main threat

 

now comes from discount superstore Wal-Mart, whose share of the market has climbed rapidly to just 5 percentage

 

points behind Best Buy’s. That development, combined with a downward pressure on prices for electronic devices

 

similar to the pressures in the PC industry, has forced Best Buy to explore new and more profitable ways of meeting

 

the needs of the market.

 

The firm’s latest initiatives include selling more upscale and higher margin merchandise, hiring highly

 

trained sales “consultants” to assist with more complex and expensive purchases, staying open for longer hours on

 

weekends, outsourcing lower end items to China, and selling installation and connection services for its products.

 

Those who prefer to shop in their pajamas can check out the possibilities online at BestBuy.com.

 

Core Problem:

 

How can Best Buy build on its Business-to-Consumer success and move

 

into the Business-to-Business world?

 

Hints:

 

Be sure that your solution (and all of your alternatives) is B2B focused.

 

Sources:

 

http://www.bestbuy.com;

 

Mark Tatge, “Fun and Games,”

 

Forbes,

 

January 12, 2004, 138; Scott Carlson, “Best Buy Extends Weekend Store

 

Hours,”

 

Saint Paul Pioneer Press,

 

February 17, 2004; Scott Carlson, “Best Buy, Target Stores Score High in Consumer-Approval Survey,”

 

Saint Paul Pioneer Press,

 

January 30, 2004; Laura Heller, “Connected Life Blooms in the Desert,”

 

DSN Retailing News,

 

February 9, 2004, 188.

 


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