(Solution) 13 Nervous Tissue Objectives In This Chapter We Will Study Methods For Diagnosing Nervous System Disorders; Two Demyelinating DiseasesGuillain-Barr... | Snapessays.com


(Solution) 13 Nervous Tissue Objectives In this chapter we will study methods for diagnosing nervous system disorders; two demyelinating diseasesGuillain-Barr...


I'm having troubles finding the answers to numbers 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 in the file I attached below. Any and all help is so greatly appreciated thank you so much.75

 

13

 

Nervous Tissue

 

Objectives

 

In this chapter we will study

 

 

methods for diagnosing nervous system disorders;

 

 

two demyelinating diseases—Guillain-Barré syndrome and multiple sclerosis;

 

 

the characteristics and treatment of brain tumors, especially gliomas; and

 

 

a brief overview of stroke, or cerebrovascular accident.

 

Diagnosing Nervous System

 

Disorders

 

The nervous system facilitates communication among

 

the trillions of body cells through rapid electrical

 

conduction of signals. When this system is disrupted,

 

many other body systems are affected as well. The

 

diagnosis of neurological disorders is especially

 

challenging, not only because the nervous system itself

 

is so complex, but also because the signs and

 

symptoms of neurological disorders can be difficult to

 

distinguish from those of other organ systems.

 

A

 

neurological

 

assessment

 

is

 

normally

 

incorporated into a standard physical examination.

 

Functions that the examining physician routinely tests

 

include the following:

 

 

special senses—

 

vision, hearing, smell, taste, and

 

balance;

 

 

general senses—

 

touch, temperature sensation,

 

vibration, and pain;

 

 

motor

 

function—

 

eye

 

movements,

 

tongue

 

movements, voice, swallowing, facial expressions,

 

muscle strength, symmetry of musculature, signs

 

of muscular atrophy, body position, gait, and

 

coordination;

 

 

deep

 

tendon

 

reflexes

 

—muscular

 

responses

 

elicited by striking a tendon with a reflex hammer

 

in such sites as the knee, elbow, wrist, ankle, and

 

heel, or by using the handle of the hammer to

 

scratch the skin in such sites as the abdomen and

 

sole; and

 

 

level of consciousness

 

—states of responsiveness,

 

or lack thereof, such as alertness, lethargy, or

 

stupor. There are specific definitions and tests for

 

these and other states.

 

When nervous system disorders are suspected, a

 

more complete neurological examination is conducted.

 

As with any other disease, the patient history provides

 

the first clues. For example, the patient’s social and

 

travel history may indicate possible exposure to toxins

 

or infectious agents that could affect the nervous

 

system, while the family history may suggest inherited

 

neurological disorders. Some of the most common

 

neurological symptoms reported by patients are

 

dizziness, insomnia, fatigue, back pain, headache,

 

muscle

 

weakness,

 

and

 

paresthesia

 

—abnormal

 

sensations such as prickling, burning, or tingling.

 

Once a neurological disorder is suspected, the

 

clinician must determine the site of the abnormality,

 

such as the brain, the spinal cord, a

 

nerve, or a

 

muscle.

 

A complete neurological examination evaluates

 

mental status, cranial nerve function, sensory

 

function, reflex function, autonomic function, and the

 

cerebral vasculature. In addition to the basic imaging

 

techniques described in chapter 2, some specialized

 

imaging methods for the nervous system include:

 

 

cerebral angiography,

 

in which the cerebral

 

blood vessels are examined by injecting an opaque

 

dye into the circulatory system and taking an X

 

ray of the head;

 

 

myelography,

 

in which dye is injected into the

 

nervous system itself to render the spinal cord and

 

nerve roots visible on X rays; and

 

 

echoencephalography,

 

ultrasound examination of

 

the nervous system.

 

In addition to imaging techniques, brain function

 

can

 

be

 

measured

 

using

 

either

 

an

 

electroencephalogram,

 

which is a recording of the

 

spontaneous electrical potentials of the brain, or

 

evoked potentials

 

, which are electrical responses of

 


Solution details:
STATUS
Answered
QUALITY
Approved
ANSWER RATING

This question was answered on: May 23, 2022

Solution~00021147602252.zip (25.37 KB)


This attachment is locked

Our expert Writers have done this assignment before, you can reorder for a fresh, original and plagiarism-free copy and it will be redone much faster (Deadline assured. Flexible pricing. TurnItIn Report provided)

Pay using PayPal (No PayPal account Required) or your credit card . All your purchases are securely protected by .
SiteLock

About this Question

STATUS

Answered

QUALITY

Approved

DATE ANSWERED

May 23, 2022

EXPERT

Tutor

ANSWER RATING

GET INSTANT HELP

We have top-notch tutors who can do your essay/homework for you at a reasonable cost and then you can simply use that essay as a template to build your own arguments.

You can also use these solutions:

  • ■ As a reference for in-depth understanding of the subject.
  • ■ As a source of ideas / reasoning for your own research (if properly referenced)
  • ■ For editing and paraphrasing.

This we believe is a better way of understanding a problem and makes use of the efficiency of time of the student.

Get Free Price Quote